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A Lock-down Marmalade recipe for you….


Right back at the conception of our B&B, inspired by the likes of Rick Stein & Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, we wanted to support and celebrate the local food heroes buying foods direct from the local artisan producers. In the same vein we wanted to produce & use our own home grown produce too. To this end we committed to only serving home-made preserves and planted many varieties of fruit bushes which we could make jams for the breakfast table all year round. However there was one flaw in this plan, Marmalade. A key breakfast ingredient. We started by making it from the tinned pulp, which was a good product but we didn’t feel that we were really ‘making’ it and so we turned to making it from scratch and discovered just how nice it can be.

 

We started selling our surplus preserves to guests. Slowly but surely our production of jams & marmalades became more substantial and last year we produced over 30 different preserves including eight chutneys and six varieties of marmalade. We grow the vast majority of key ingredients ourselves from farm to fork as it were and in 2020 we were proud to have been awarded a Certificate of Merit from The World’s Original Marmalade Awards held in Cumbria for our Seville Orange & Chocolate Marmalade.

 

So now we are a B&B and an artisan preserves producer making, in a non-Covid year, about 300 jars of which about 80 are Marmalade. This means that we have to book out 3 days each January, in the short period that the Seville oranges are available, to make all the Orange Marmalade requirements for the whole year. As each year out sells the previous year we are also trying to predict the increase too.

We are right in the middle of this production at the moment and we thought perhaps for those that are wishing to try something new that we would share our recipe for you. So here is The Old Bakery’s breakfast Seville Orange Marmalade recipe. Good luck.

 

We make in bulk so this recipe makes about 12~14 pound jars which is the very maximum we advise for a standard preserving pan. Halve the recipe for a more manageable quantity.

Ingredients

4lb   (1.8kg)    Seville oranges  (washed)

2  Large Lemons  (washed)

8 pints (4.5lt)  of water

8lb   (3.6kg)   Granulated white sugar

 

 

 

 

  1. Set up a pudding bowl with a muslin bag or cloth inside. Ideally a cloth at least 1′ (30cm) square.
  2. Cut the fruit (lemons too) in half and squeeze out the juice.
  3. Put the pithy pulp and seeds into the muslin then pour the juice in too. The juice will filter through into the bowl.
  4. Most of the pith should have been removed in the squeezing process but use the side of a spoon by scraping to remove any surplus. Add this pulp into the muslin cloth. There should be about 1~2mm of white pith still attached to the skin. 
  5. You should now have a big pile of empty fruit skin halves. With a sharp knife cut each skin in half then cut this width ways into fine thin strips of peel about 1~2 inches (3~5cm)long and as thin as you wish the rind to be. Set aside.
  6. Place the water into a large preserving pan. Tie up the pith & pulp filled muslin bag leaving the contents loose enough that the juices can flow through it but ensuring that the contents cannot leak out during the boiling process. This pith provides the pectin setting agent to the juice. Tie the bag to the pan’s handle so it hangs in the water but just off the base of the pan. Add the juice into the pan from the bowl that the muslin bag sat in. Now add all of your slices of skin rinds into the liquid in the pan.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 .
  7. Stand a wooden spoon’s handle upright in the pan and mark on it with a pencil the height of the liquid. Slowly bring the pan to the boil and then keep it simmering for one and a half to 2 hours.  Reduce the liquid by nearly half stirring every 20 minutes to ensure nothing is sticking to the bottom using the wooden spoon measure as your guide. The rinds should then be soft enough that you can squish it between your fingers. If not, keep it simmering a little longer but you may have to add a minimal amount of extra water. In the last half hour be extra vigilant that nothing burns at the base of the pan.
  8. Place 4 saucers into the freezer to cool down for  a ‘setting’ test later on.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          .
  9. Take off the heat, remove the muslin bag and let the juice cool. We then decant this juice into a bowl & wash the pan out as it can have some residue stuck on the sides. We replace the juice back into the pan and then stir in the sugar ensuring it has completely dissolved, slightly warming the pan helps. When it has thoroughly dissolved turn the heat up high and bring the marmalade to the boil. Keep the marmalade rapidly boiling for 15 minutes stirring several times to prevent burning at the pan base. You do not need to have full heat to do this and it is best to use the least heat that you can get away with to keep the rapid boiling going. KEEP AN EYE ON IT throughout the 15 minutes as it can boil over and make an awful mess.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   .
  10. After the 15 minutes remove from the heat, pour a little marmalade onto one of the saucers from the freezer and place it into the fridge for 6 minutes. Then take it out and run your finger through the marmalade on the saucer, if the mixture doesn’t immediately fill the gap then it is  ready to pot up. If not boil in 5 minute increments carrying out the plate test until it is set.
  11. Pour into sterilised jars, carefully, using a ladle and jam funnel and seal immediately as this will make a vacuum seal as it cools. You can best sterilise the jars before hand by washing in the dishwasher on the hottest wash making sure that they are fully air dried before filling.
  12. Let the marmalade cool, spread on some fresh bread & butter and enjoy.

 

The recipe is repeated below without photos for ease of following;-

Ingredients

4lb   (1.8kg)    Seville oranges  (washed)

2  Large Lemons  (washed)

8 pints (4.5lt)  of water

8lb   (3.6kg)   Granulated white sugar

 

  1. Set up a pudding bowl with a muslin bag or cloth inside. Ideally a cloth at least 1′ (30cm) square.
  2. Cut the fruit (lemons too) in half and squeeze out the juice.
  3. Put the pithy pulp and seeds into the muslin then pour the juice in too. The juice will filter through into the bowl.
  4. Most of the pith should have been removed in the squeezing process but use the side of a spoon by scraping to remove any surplus. Add this pulp into the muslin cloth. There should be about 1~2mm of white pith still attached to the skin.
  5. You should now have a big pile of empty fruit skin halves. With a sharp knife cut each skin in half then cut this into fine thin strips of peel about 1~2 inches (3~5cm)long and as thin as you wish the rind to be. Set aside.
  6. Place the water into a large preserving pan. Tie up the pith & pulp filled muslin bag leaving the contents loose enough that the juices can flow through it but ensuring that the contents cannot leak out during the boiling process. This pith provides the pectin setting agent to the juice. Tie the bag to the pan’s handle so it hangs in the water but just off the base of the pan. Add the juice into the pan from the bowl that the muslin bag sat in. Now add all of your slices of skin rinds into the liquid in the pan.
  7. Stand a wooden spoon’s handle upright in the pan and mark on it with a pencil the height of the liquid. Slowly bring the pan to the boil and then keep it simmering for one and a half to 2 hours.  Then using the wooden spoon measure reduce the liquid by nearly half stirring every 20 minutes to ensure nothing is sticking to the bottom. The rinds should then be soft enough that you can squish it between your fingers. If not, keep it simmering a little longer but you may have to add a minimal amount of extra water. In the last half hour be extra vigilant that nothing burns at the base of the pan.
  8. Place 4 saucers into the freezer to cool down for  a ‘setting’ test later on.
  9. Take off the heat, remove the muslin bag and let the juice cool. I then decant this juice into a bowl & wash the pan out as it can have some residue stuck on the sides. I replace the juice back into the pan and then stir in the sugar ensuring it has completely dissolved, slightly warming the pan helps. When it has thoroughly dissolved turn the heat up high and bring the marmalade to the boil. Keep the marmalade rapidly boiling for 15 minutes stirring several times to prevent burning at the pan base. You do not need to have full heat to do this and it is best to use the least heat that you can get away with to keep the rapid boiling going. KEEP AN EYE ON IT throughout the 15 minutes as it can boil over and make an awful mess.
  10. After the 15 minutes remove from the heat, pour a little marmalade onto one of the saucers from the freezer and place it into the fridge for 6 minutes. Then take it out and run your finger through the marmalade on the saucer, if the mixture doesn’t immediately fill the gap then it is  ready to pot up. If not boil in 5 minute increments carrying out the plate test until it is set.
  11. Pour into sterilised jars, carefully, using a ladle and jam funnel and seal immediately as this will make a vacuum seal as it cools. You can best sterilise the jars before hand by washing in the dishwasher on the hottest wash making sure that they are fully air dried before filling.
  12. Let the marmalade cool, spread on some fresh bread & butter and enjoy.